Lazlo Magazine
jamopi:

SHELF NUNNY.
Degen(d)erationIf you’re a feminist who understands the (apparently not) radical concept that women can have penises and men can have vaginas (and that there are people with either or both of those who may very well identify as neither a man nor a woman), would you mind reblogging this? I could really use a little faith in humanity being restored right about now.

Degen(d)eration
If you’re a feminist who understands the (apparently not) radical concept that women can have penises and men can have vaginas (and that there are people with either or both of those who may very well identify as neither a man nor a woman), would you mind reblogging this? I could really use a little faith in humanity being restored right about now.


Little Big Press travelling library @ b>gallery café

Curated by 3/3 - Lazlo’s amazing photo editors - Little Big Press is an annual exhibition, a travelling library and a travelling bookshop devoted to self-published and indipendent photobooks.Little Big Press travelling library is selection of some of the most interesting photobooks produced in the last years that will occupy for a month the spaces of b>gallery café bookshop in Rome.March 22 - April 22 Opening March 22- 6pm Dj set Alessandro Penso
Little Big Press travelling library @ b>gallery café

Curated by 3/3 - Lazlo’s amazing photo editors - Little Big Press is an annual exhibition, a travelling library and a travelling bookshop devoted to self-published and indipendent photobooks.

Little Big Press travelling library is selection of some of the most interesting photobooks produced in the last years that will occupy for a month the spaces of b>gallery café bookshop in Rome.

March 22 - April 22
Opening March 22- 6pm
Dj set Alessandro Penso

Let’s celebrate the International Women’s Day with Camille Paglia, guest on special one-on-one discussion at Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher in 1995

Fantastic Voyage

The Scale of the Universe2  - http://htwins.net/scale2 - by Cary Huang is a nice online application to navigate the universe zooming in or out by factors of ten. Even if not state it the site is clearly inspired by Powers of Ten, the little masterpiece that the Eames Office produced in 1968 for IBM.

Gino Paoli, Il cielo in una stanza, 1971

Quando sei qui con me
questa stanza non ha più pareti
ma alberi,
alberi infiniti
quando sei qui vicino a me
questo soffitto viola
no, non esiste più.
Io vedo il cielo sopra noi
che restiamo qui
abbandonati
come se non ci fosse più
niente, più niente al mondo.
Suona un’armonica
mi sembra un organo
che vibra per te e per me
su nell’immensità del cielo.
Per te, per me:
nel cielo. 


Filippo Romano from Soleritown, 2006

http://www.filipporomano.eu

Unfulfilled Utopias (excerpt)

by Chiara Capodici

I had never realized how paradoxical speaking about utopias can be, at least in a literal sense, when the initial idea is that of asking oneself what it means to really live in a place. Maybe it is for this reason that toying with the idea ofunfulfilled utopias — utopias that don’t take place, but perhaps do have a place — seems like a good way to get around and at the same time deal with this paradox. Certainly it is a way to plant out feet more firmly on the ground. And with that, it is also a way of making a more proper sense of “inhabiting” possible again.

Despite their dreamy, illusory structures, some — such as the Health Resort Zzyzx in the Mojave Desert in California — are nothing but deceits that you can and do live in. Others are clear and extraordinary examples of alternative ways of life, such as the Earthships in the Earthhaven Ecovillage, founded in 1994 near Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Others still, like Arcosanti, are experiences that resist and endure, even if to do so they must adapt. These experiences give life to paradoxes, and emphasize all the tensions and ambivalences inherent in this idea of utopian living. Nonetheless, they are hugely important models for rethinking architectural, urban, and community life concepts.

Arcosanti is the concrete representation of the ideals and utopias of one of those architects (Paolo Soleri) who found their creative and productive dimension more easily in the United States than in their native Europe in the years following the Second World War. Arcosanti is the prototype of arcology, an urban-development ideal opposing modern “urban sprawls”, inspired by the ideal of bringing together in a limited environment all the complexities of a modern city, by creating a high-density human settlement, where cars are not needed.

The area of Arcosanti that was eventually built corresponds to a little more than 5% of the original plan. The latter envisioned two large structures, capable of accommodating 5000 people. Present buildings are made up of two vaulted structures and two big apses around which there are a series of inhabitable cells, for up to about 600 people. Currently, about one hundred people live there and — although it is constantly developing — Arcosanti is not self-sufficient. Watched over by the mystical figure of Soleri, architect-guru and prophet, chief promoter and executor, its utopian life survives thanks to volunteers and tourists.

[more on Lazlo Magazine_Issue 0_On Dwelling]

               

                    Filippo Romano, Portrait of Architect Paolo Soleri


Issey Miyake Seasons, photographed by Peppe Tortora

http://www.isseymiyake.com/

http://www.peppetortora.com/site/#fashion/1

ON OUR SHELVES_part II

 La Central’s Picks…

La disolución de la estancia

Transformaciones domésticas 1930-1960 by José Morales

selected by Nuria Solsona

Domestic domain as something close, personalised and special is nothing new. However, it was a novelty between the nineteen-thirties and sixties. It was brought to light by the concerns of some architects who were worried by social facts that they felt were related to a need for change in ways of inhabiting.

 This book encompasses several examples of the first dwellings that have one thing in common: their architects strove to take the concept of the room as an intimate and comfortable space a step further. These are rooms whose design transformed domestic space, changing the habits of the dweller in respect to space and leisure time. Stretching from the vanguard to the late nineteen-sixties, the examples given detail how domestic transformation has contributed to the approach of architectural space to its use, which is inseparable from the personal.

Le Corbusier started by changing the inhabitant’s point of view, reconsidering proportions, heights, views; Sert domesticated leisure culture and dissolved the room by means of external light; Charles and Ray Eames, without a doubt, created the maximum exponents of a happy celebration of daily life… Many more examples provide an overview of the history of architectural comfort and the inseparable relationship between the psychological and the spatial.

Private and intimate needs are just as much behind the idea of inhabiting as is collective desire. That is why “rooms” always look beyond the window, relieve as much as protect bodies and are dissolved into the exterior landscape of intimate dreams.

This publication won an FAD Architecture prize (2006) in the category of “Thought and Critics”.

                                  

The Interventionists. Users’ Manual for the Creative Disruption of Everyday Life”. Editors Nato Thompson and Gregory Sholette. Catalogue from the exhibition “The Interventionists: Art in the Social Sphere” organized by MASS MoCA, from May 2004 until March 2005. 

selected by Mireia Saladrigues

This book is not a traditional exhibition catalogue. It works—as its subtitle says—as a manual with tactics for civil disobedience, building low-cost shelters for life in the streets, glimpsing at the behind-the-scenes world of business, performing in front of surveillance cameras, GMO food-testing units, managing free speech and dissidence and all other kinds of tools for developing your own politics. The projects are ordered into four different chapters: Nomads, Reclaim the Streets, Ready to Wear and The Experimental University, making them easy to access. These practitioners, who work more comfortably within a community of activists than in a gallery, might not bring about a social revolution in the age of global capitalism, but they will most likely inspire acts of resistance within our everyday lives.